I finally decided to take the next step with my pancetta. I ended up waiting an additional 6 days for few reasons. The first was based upon the fact that I was having a helluva time trying to calibrate the humidity levels in my curing chamber. The humidifier that I purchased had three settings; Low, Medium and High. I first started out on High and could not seem to find a happy medium where I could keep the humidity consistent. Next, I tried the lowest setting which again produced inconsistent levels which is not good when trying to dry cure something. Moderation, which clearly is not part of my vocabulary just so happen to be the perfect setting…go figure! Anyways, the curing chamber lamenting coupled with the fact that my soon-to-be pancetta didn’t seem to firm up quite the way I remember the bacon feeling. I would overhaul it daily and check the “squishiness” and it just didn’t feel like it should until about 13 days into the cure.

Fresh out of the ziplock with brine intact

After determining that pork belly was finally ready to be removed from the brine I rinsed it thoroughly under cold running water, as cold as water gets in Arizona in the dwindling days of summer that is.

Pancetta post-rinse

After rinsing I thoroughly dried it off with paper towels and prepared to sprinkle the cut side of the pork belly with fresh ground black Tellicherry pepper.

Pancetta, post-black pepper sprinkling

After sprinkling with the pepper I began the process of rolling the belly up and tying into the classic pancetta style form we are all familiar with.

Then I rolled a hog leg...pork belly to be more precise.

The best thing that I found to fully prepare me for the process of tying up the rolled pork belly was the website www.chow.com. This website provides the best detail I have seen on how to actually tie one of these bad boys up.

Given the fact that I was rolling the pork belly and tying it the best I could, it was impossible for me to photograph the process however, I do have a few photos that would suggest that I pulled it off in a bush-league type manner.

Hanging Out!

By the grace of god I actually found the perfect setting for the curing chamber and can peacefully put my pancetta away to rest for approximately 2 weeks as suggested by the authors of Charcuterie. I also weighed the pancetta, just to see how much water weight will be lost over the next two weeks. Based upon my research it seems that 30% (water weight) is often the number one would look for in dry cured salami.

Proud Pappa Shot!

As you will see I actually made two rolls of pancetta which weighed 1080 grams and 896 grams respectively. As prescribed by Charcuterie I am maintaining a solid 60 degrees in the curing chamber and humidity between 55% and 65%. In about 14 days or so I will report back with the process and some pics.

I trimmed the belly slightly before rolling to square the sides up a bit and decided to fry the trimmings up with a little bit of olive oil. While salty I found the pancetta to clearly posses the flavors of bay leaf, garlic and nutmeg.

Looks kinda freaky but tasted great!

I can’t wait to fry up the finished product! Until then, I did the beef jerky recipe under the Salt chapter and will be reporting that before the weekend…I hope!

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